PaulNW
Share PaulNW's profile
 
Facebook Twitter
 
 
 
PaulNW's Stats
 
  • Review Count
    3
  • Helpfulness Votes
    0
  • First Review
    26 September 2012
  • Last Review
    27 November 2013
  • Featured Reviews
    0
  • Average Rating
    4.3
 
Reviews Comments
  • Review Comment Count
    0
  • Helpfulness Votes
    0
  • First Review Comment
    None
  • Last Review Comment
    None
  • Featured Review Comments
    0
 
Questions
  • Question Count
    0
  • Helpfulness Votes
    0
  • First Question
    None
  • Last Question
    None
  • Featured Questions
    0
 
  • Answer Count
    2
  • Helpfulness Votes
    8
  • First Answer
    12 October 2011
  • Last Answer
    26 September 2012
  • Featured Answers
    0
  • Best Answers
    1
 
 
PaulNW's Reviews
 
 Panaracer Pasela PT City Wire Bead Tyre
Panaracer Pasela PT City Wire Bead Tyre
The Pasela PT is and excellent multi-use tyre and available for MTB wheels. It incorporates PT (Puncture Technology) for added puncture. PT delivers 3x the puncture resistance of Kevlar® belted technologies.
 
Overall rating 
5 / 5
Avg 5 / 5 from
Long lasting
Posted27 November 2013
Quality 
5 / 5
Avg 5 / 5 from
Value 
5 / 5
Avg 5 / 5 from
Performance 
5 / 5
Avg 5 / 5 from
Appearance 
5 / 5
Avg 5 / 5 from
Fit / Size 
5 / 5
Avg 5 / 5 from
PaulNW
fromSouthern England
Country : United Kingdom
Age : Over 65
Interest : Road Cyclist
Level : Regular
Gender : Male
"Panaracer Pasela beats anything I’ve ever monitored.
I ride my Thorn Audax year-round in all weathers, mainly on country lanes and occasionally off road.
The original front tyre (Panaracer Pasela) has just been replaced at 6,670 miles.
The original rear Panaracer Pasela lasted 3,330 miles, followed by Gatorskin (1670 miles), and Continental Grand Prix 4 Season (1440 miles), at which point I saw the light and returned to Panaracer Pasela.
No prizes for guessing my future choice!
"
Pros: Durable, High Quality, Good Fit
Cons: none
0points
0of 0voted this as helpful.
 
 Classic Otis Road City Tyre
Classic Otis Road City Tyre
Part of the Classic European-based line, the Classic Otis is ideal for city terrain with its grooved-slick pattern, plus additional side grooving for increased traction.
 
Overall rating 
4 / 5
Avg 4 / 5 from
It's fine
Posted26 September 2012
Quality 
4 / 5
Avg 4 / 5 from
Value 
4 / 5
Avg 4 / 5 from
PaulNW
fromSouthern England
Country : United Kingdom
Age : Over 65
Interest : Road Cyclist
Level : Regular
Gender : Male
"On-line buying from Wiggle was easy.
Wiggle Price was “competitive”.
Delivery was quick.
The tyre looks fine and seems fit for purpose. It fitted easily though it is too soon to comment on durability or performance.
"
Pros: Attractive, Good Fit
0points
0of 0voted this as helpful.
 
 Continental Quality Road Inner Tube
Continental Quality Road Inner Tube
The Continental quality road inner tube is a must have cycling essential for 700c bike wheels.
 
Overall rating 
4 / 5
Avg 4 / 5 from
It's fine
Posted26 September 2012
PaulNW
fromSouthern England
Country : United Kingdom
Age : Over 65
Interest : Road Cyclist
Level : Regular
Gender : Male
Budget : Value for money
"On-line buying from Wiggle was easy.
Wiggle Price was “competitive”.
Delivery was quick.
The tube looks fine and seems fit for purpose. It fitted easily though it is obviously too soon to comment on durability.
"
0points
0of 0voted this as helpful.
 
PaulNW's Questions
 
PaulNW has not submitted any questions.
 
PaulNW's Answers
 
 CTC Plastic Bike Bag
CTC Plastic Bike Bag
Place your dirty bike in this bag before loading into your car/van and save yourself the trouble of cleaning up the mess after the bike has been taken out when you arrive home.
 

airport approved

does anyone know are airlines happy to take bikes inside one of these and if so do they still insist on wheel off and handlebars turned.
can you just get away with wheeling it inside and wheeling it out of the bag the other end at luggage reclaim as it stands. its such a phaff having to do all the mechanical stuff to the bike to ship it to point of tour start? this looks like the answer to my problems if the airline are happy with it
Best answer
BA was quite happy to take my road bike in one of these bags. Heathrow/Amsterdam. It was even OK on the Reading/Heathrow coach. I checked beforehand by email with the coach company, BA and Heathrow.
The mechanical stuff – It is a necessary pain. – You could check with your airline, but be aware some airports have their own whims. Best to play by everybody’s rules. These usually are:-
Pedals must be turned inward (or removed to your bag).
Handlebars must be turned round so they line up with the frame.
Wheels - Keep them on - But see comment below.
A bag is required to protect other people's baggage from your (dirty?) bike.

The rest of this is my recommendations and opinions based on my experiences to September 2011.:-
If you have drop handlebars, rotate them to protect the cables, and so that the package has fewer lumps sticking out.
Wheels- leave them on if possible – while fitted they protect other parts of the bike – If removed, they may scratch the frame, and everything is more vulnerable.
Deflating tyres is a really bad idea – it risks almost certain damage during handling. The lower pressure at 50,000 feet is minimal compared to the pressure already in your tyres. (There is a technical and authentic explanation of this somewhere online). If you are worried, just let them down about 20 percent..
Protect fragile or vulnerable fittings by rotating then out of harm’s way, or removing, eg light fittings.
Rear mech - I prefer to unbolt it (one bolt), and hang it below the frame with tape. I feel it is better like that than being a sticking-out, vulnerable item.
Check airline and airport regulations for maximum dimensions. Dropping the saddle could be one way to reduce the overall height of the package. (I did notice my package was only just small enough to fit into the x-ray machine at Amsterdam.) Take the front wheel off (rather than the back) if necessary to reduce overall length.

Add a layer of gaffer tape on the outside of the bag beneath each wheel to reduce the risk of it tearing if the “package” is dragged along the ground - I saw this done to mine. Don't try cutting holes in the bottom of the bag for the wheels to spin round – They won’t!
Tape your tools to the frame (you are probably not allowed to take them in the cabin), or put them in "hold baggage".
Add a clear label, to the bag and the bike, with your name, flight details, mobile number or email address, so that the bike and you are more traceable if there is any delay.
Gaffer tape is great for securing the bag.
Allow about an hour before check-in to carry out the packaging. It is a pain, but better than a holiday spoiled by a damaged, or delayed, bike. Some airports require an earlier check in for large packages. If you're late you risk your bike being delayed.
In the week before traveling, try all your rotating, dismantling and packaging to ensure it all works.
I would do it all again exactly the same way next time I take bike by air.
It is a useful to have a paper copy of the airline’s and airports’ regulations on the subject. If necessary you can diplomatically show them to any doubtful staff. (This paid off for me when carrying a lifejacket – No I don’t cycle on water, but I do go sailing!)

I saw a cyclist at Heathrow do the pedals and handlebars, then put his mountain bike in a groundsheet. A drawstring through all the eyelets closed it up. Cheap and cheerful; but the transparent nature of the approved bag allows handlers to see what they are grasping and to handle and stow it more appropriately. Good value for money.
Go for it. Enjoy your trip.
User submitted photo
2 years, 2 months ago
by
PaulNW
Southern England
 
 CTC Plastic Bike Bag
CTC Plastic Bike Bag
Place your dirty bike in this bag before loading into your car/van and save yourself the trouble of cleaning up the mess after the bike has been taken out when you arrive home.
 

Bike Storage

I store my bike outside during winter, would this bag keep my bike dry during the cold damp months?
You could use it for outdoor storage. It will keep the rain off, but frequent putting in and out will eventually cause wear and tear. Also, if you close the bag too thoroughly it will retain any moisture on the bike exacerbating corrosion.
User submitted photo
3 years, 1 month ago
by
PaulNW
Southern England