Foreverpedalling
Share Foreverpedalling's profile
 
Facebook Twitter
 
 
 
Foreverpedalling's Stats
 
  • Review Count
    1
  • Helpfulness Votes
    0
  • First Review
    03 September 2010
  • Last Review
    03 September 2010
  • Featured Reviews
    0
  • Average Rating
    4
 
Reviews Comments
  • Review Comment Count
    0
  • Helpfulness Votes
    0
  • First Review Comment
    None
  • Last Review Comment
    None
  • Featured Review Comments
    0
 
Questions
  • Question Count
    0
  • Helpfulness Votes
    0
  • First Question
    None
  • Last Question
    None
  • Featured Questions
    0
 
  • Answer Count
    4
  • Helpfulness Votes
    0
  • First Answer
    03 September 2010
  • Last Answer
    03 September 2010
  • Featured Answers
    0
  • Best Answers
    0
 
 
Foreverpedalling's Reviews
 
 Twin Rail Dual Compound 2.2 MTB Tyre
Twin Rail Dual Compound 2.2 MTB Tyre
A dual compound variant of the ground braking Trail and Street Halo Twin Rail tyre tread.
 
Overall rating 
4 / 5
Avg 4 / 5 from
Great in the dry, but not in the mud
Posted03 September 2010
Quality 
5 / 5
Avg 5 / 5 from
Value 
5 / 5
Avg 5 / 5 from
Performance 
4 / 5
Avg 4 / 5 from
Foreverpedalling
fromHuntingdon
Country : United Kingdom
Age : 45-54
Interest : Road Cyclist
Level : Regular
Gender : Male
Budget : Value for money
"I bought a pair of these earlier this summer for use on long rides that would predominantly be on road or hard packed off-road surfaces. They have been excellent.
For example, a regular road route I do in an evening on a pair of Maxxis Ignitors would take me about 1:15. On the Twin Rails, and according to my Garmin where I'd maintained a similar heart rate and consumed a similar amount of calories (I never believe that bit), it took 1:03, a noticeable difference!
The 2.2's are bulky enough to provide a good air cushion that absorbs any vibration ensuring a comfy ride, and to date they have resisted all thorns, no punctures at all this summer, a first!
However, don't take these tyres into the mud. The recesses between the rails and in the tread quickly filled up with mud and the tyres spun and slipped constantly. On the slightest slope it was all I could do to stay upright.
Also, if I needed to brake quickly on a wet road, the twin rails acted like twin blades, and I skidded easily.
But, they're not intended for muddy or wet surfaces, and on the dry stuff they're the best MTB tyres I've used and would certainly recommend them.
"
Pros: Great Value, Attractive, High Quality, low rolling resistance, good puncture resistance
Cons: not good in mud or the wet
0points
0of 0voted this as helpful.
 
Foreverpedalling's Questions
 
Foreverpedalling has not submitted any questions.
 
Foreverpedalling's Answers
 
 Marathon Kevlar (Old Tread) MTB Tyres
Marathon Kevlar (Old Tread) MTB Tyres
Europe's most popular long-distance and commuting tyre. Featuring Scwalbes 'OLD TREAD' pattern in Allround compound for better wear; Snake skin sidewall for better abrasion resistance and KevlarGuard puncture protection.
 

My "knoblies" are 26x1.95. What size of "slick" should I order?

I'd go for Schwalbe Marathon Plus 26 x 1.75
4 years, 2 months ago
by
Foreverpedalling
Huntingdon
 
The new Double Fighter II is modeled on the successful concept of its predecessor. The centre, with its light tread rolls smoothly and quietly on tarmac. Off-road, the shoulder's heavy tread provides the necessary grip.
 

Tyre Direction

I have just recieved a pair of Continental Double Fighter tyres and I am really pleased with them!
Just one thing when fitting the tyres I presume the front tyre has the front directional arrow facing to the front of the bike!
With the rear does the front arrow face the front or the rear arrow face the front??
The idea of having the back tyre 'backwards' is to provide an added bite in the tread as the back wheel is your driving tyre, but it increases the rolling resistance. I found that the Double Fighter tread isn't deep enough to make a great deal of difference on soft ground, so I fitted them both the same way around.
4 years, 2 months ago
by
Foreverpedalling
Huntingdon
 
The new Double Fighter II is modeled on the successful concept of its predecessor. The centre, with its light tread rolls smoothly and quietly on tarmac. Off-road, the shoulder's heavy tread provides the necessary grip.
 

Replace a 26x1.95 tyre - what other sizes would be ok?

The tyre I have on my bike are 26x1.95. I'm wanting to change to some fast rolling tyres and the preferred tyres come in 1.90 or 2.00 widths.

What are the min\max widths I should consider assuming I cannot get the 1.95 width?

Thanks Greg
You've got to ensure you have the best part of a centimetre clearance either side of the tyre and your forks/stays, otherwise any mud on the tyre will clog up on the frame.
Have a look at the Twin Rail 2.2's, see my review, they're wider than 1.95's but weren't too wide in the frame, and were very fast rolling without being a slick.
4 years, 2 months ago
by
Foreverpedalling
Huntingdon
 
The new Double Fighter II is modeled on the successful concept of its predecessor. The centre, with its light tread rolls smoothly and quietly on tarmac. Off-road, the shoulder's heavy tread provides the necessary grip.
 

What would be a suitable inner tube?

I'm new to mountain biking and have had these tyres recommended to me as a good road tyre which will also suit some light off roading.

Could anyone recommend a suitable inner tube for this tyre or does it not matter that much?

Cheers!
I've been using a pair of these tyres on and off for some time and have found them to be good on roads, but not very good in the mud, particularly if it's wet. I now use them on my commuter bike.
As for inner tubes, it's never mattered what sort I use as long as they're the right size, for instance, don't try 2.1-2.6 tubes if your tyres are 2.1's, go for the 1.7-2.1's instead.
4 years, 2 months ago
by
Foreverpedalling
Huntingdon